Council Asks for Alternatives for Parkland School Takings

March 3, 2017
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By Joseph Domelowicz Jr.

The lone property owner whose land sits in the middle of the proposed school project on Parkland Avenue was before the City Council’s Parks and Public Property subcommittee Tuesday night to review an alternative to a public taking of her home, while still making her land available to the city for the school project.

Janet Guanci, who owns the home at 97 Parkland Avenue, which must be moved in order to make way for the road into the proposed new school – if a March 14 public vote on the project is successful – said following the meeting that she feels the city, and the Council, are attempting to treat her fairly, despite the city’s need to take her land for the school project.

According to city attorney James Lamanna, the latest proposal is for the city to look into the feasibility of moving Guanci’s Parkland home from its current location at 97 Parkland, to city owned land several hundred yards away, which would allow her and her family to remain in the neighborhood they have lived in since 2004.

“(ISD) Commissioner Donovan  has indicated that moving the home may be a more cost effective solution for the city and is an option that would allow the property owner to remain (in her home),” explained Lamana.

Ward Two Councilor William Trahant then engaged Guanci, indicating that the city is simply attempting to give her as many viable alternatives as possible.

“We know that you are unhappy and we are sensitive to that,” said Trahant. “We are just looking for a way to give you an option and maybe stay in that home, because I know that you have put a lot of work into that home and that you have said you want to stay in the neighborhood.”

Councilors Darren Cyr, Wayne Lozzi, Trahant and Brian LaPierre all spoke with Guanci following the subcommittee hearing, with LaPierre noting, “we don’t want to take your property,” but that in the interest of providing the best options for the school department and the children of Lynn, moving or razing the home may be necessary, if the ballot question measure to build two new schools passes.

Lamanna similarly told Guanci that the city is doing all it can, “to make you whole, as the law requires us to do. This is just one alternative, but the choice would be yours.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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